Radio Feature: BBC Radio 3 – Record Review

Andrew McGregor -Record Review

Bach’s Violin Concerto in E in Building a Library with Mark Lowther and Andrew McGregor

New classical releases, including Harriet Smith on chamber music, and in Building a Library, Mark Lowther recommends a recording of Bach’s Violin Concerto in E, BWV1042. Program presented by Andrew McGregor.

Listen to the full program

9.30
Building a Library
Another chance to hear Mark Lowther discussing the available recordings of Bach’s Violin Concerto in E major, BWV 1042 and making a recommendation.

Johann Sebastian Bach’s E major Concerto is one of the evergreen concertos of the violin repertoire, its three movements and based on the Venetian concerto model made famous by Vivaldi.

10.50
Harriet Smith has been listening to recent chamber music recordings.

11.20
Record of the Week
Andrew recommends an outstanding new release.

Grieg: The Violin Sonatas

Eldbjørg Hemsing (violin)

Simon Trpčeski (piano)

BIS BIS-2456 (SACD Hybrid)

Recording Review: Rondo Magazin

Matthias Siehler, RONDO – Das Klassik & Jazz Magazin – 28.03.2020

BIS Records/ Klassikcenter Kassel BISSACD-2456
(72 Min., 12/2018, 03 & 09/2019)

Sie greift kraftvoll zu, sie klingt rau, kompakt, fassbar. Der Geigenton der jungen Norwegerin Eldbjørg Hemsing atmet nichts Leichtgewichtiges, Esoterisches, Anämisches. Diese Künstlerin hat einen Willen und eine Vorstellung, sie möchte wissen, dabei aber ebenso sich verströmen, kommunizieren, mitteilen. Es liegt etwas Drängendes, Aufgestautes in diesem Spiel, das spannungsvoll rausmöchte. Und das den melodiezarten, temperamentvollen, aber auch gern als Salonmusik geschmähten drei Violinsonaten ihres berühmten Landsmanns Edvard Grieg konsequent alles Säuselige, nebenbei Gesungene nimmt. Eldbjørg Hemsing geht diese Musik vehement und direkt an. Das verdichtet sich zu einem quellklaren, wunderfeinen, strukturhellen Parcours durch Musik, die in den ersten beiden Sonaten, die nur zwei Jahre auseinanderliegen, ungestüm und naturhaft klingt; erst in der späteren 3. Sonate von 1886 tönt es etwas abgeklärter. So mündet das dann folgerichtig in einer kurzen, solistisch vorgetragenen Eigenkomposition der 30-Jährigen: „Homecoming“, Variationen nach einem Volkslied aus Valdres, nimmt diesen scheinbar folkloristisch warmen, aber eben doch künstlerisch erfundenen, spätromantisch intensiven Grieg-Tonfall auf und gibt ihm einen modernen Anstrich. Simon Trpčeski, sonst als Solist unterwegs, lässt sich hier nicht unterkriegen, ist deutlich Partner auf Augenhöhe, der eigene Farben beisteuert, teilweise auch massiv die Marschrichtung vorgibt. Aber er kann durchaus Eldbjørg Hemsing den Vortritt lassen, denn beide sind sich in Temperatur und Intensität ebenbürtig. Ein toller Grieg-Parcours – der Landschaftlichkeit wie Leidenschaftlichkeit.

English version below

She seizes powerfully, she sounds rough, compact, tangible. The violin tone of the young Norwegian Eldbjørg Hemsing breathes nothing light, esoteric, anemic. This artist has a will and an imagination, she wants to know, but at the same time she also wants to exude, communicate and share. There is something urgent, something accumulated in this game, which needs to come out. And which consistently takes everything that is cute and song-like away from the melodious, spirited three violin sonatas by her famous compatriot Edvard Grieg, often disparaged as salon music. Eldbjørg Hemsing approaches this music vehemently and directly. This condenses into a clear, wonderfully fine, structurally bright course through music that sounds impetuous and natural in the first two sonatas, which are only two years apart; only in the later 3rd sonata from 1886 does it sound somewhat more serene. This then consequently leads to a short composition of the 30-year-old’s own, performed as a soloist: “Homecoming”, variations on a folk song from Valdres, takes up this apparently folkloristically warm, yet artistically invented, late-romantic, intense Grieg tone and gives it a modern touch. Simon Trpčeski, otherwise a soloist on the road, doesn’t let himself get pushed to the side here, is clearly a partner at eye level, contributing his own colours, sometimes massively setting the direction of the march. But he can certainly give way to Eldbjørg Hemsing, because both are equal in temperature and intensity. A great Grieg patcours – of landscape and passion.

Klassisk Karantene: Nordic Classics – Eldbjørg Hemsing on Borgströms Violin Concerto

Klassisk Karantene, Inspiration – March 29th 2020

As Quarantine time is a perfect time to expand your repertoire, Quarantine Classics provides a series of musicians sharing their favorite Nordic gems. Violinist Eldbjørg Hemsing is on something of a mission in bringing Borgström’s music back to life.

A few years ago, I was introduced to the music of Hjalmar Borgström, a name I was not previously familiar with, and I was very surprised to learn that he had been famous as both a composer and critic in Norway at the beginning of the 20th century. 

Born in Kristiania in 1864, Hjalmar Borgström played both piano and violin from an early age. He studied composition with Johan Svendsen (1881-83) and with Ludvig M. Lindeman (1883-87). After that, like many Nordic composers in preceding generations, Borgström went to Germany to study and spent some years at the Leipzig conservatory. However, in contrast to Grieg who returned from Germany firmly resolved to carve out an authentic, Norwegian idiom, Borgström came back a staunch proponent of new German symphonic music. His Violin Concerto in G major was first performed in 1914 as part of a celebration of the centenary of the Norwegian constitution.

When opening the score of his first violin concerto for the first time I was immediately intrigued. This concerto is incredibly beautiful, full of Norwegian Nationalist sentiment so typical of its time but also worthy of international attention. It reminds me of where I come from – the rugged landscape of Valdres and Jotunheimen, where the surrounding mountains rise dramatically over the valleys – and the music makes me yearn for my roots. At the same time, the concerto is very technically demanding and Borgström clearly knew how to compose for a virtuoso violinist. The first movement has a bit of an unusual form, there are many fragments and hints of Norwegian roots without going too deep into it. A bit into the movement comes the theme which has one of the most beautiful moment; completely pure in harmony and expression, making the dialogue between the cellos and solo part shimmer. The second movement is as if taken out of a Wagner-opera; the violin sounds like a soprano and is given a big palate of colors to paint with. The third movement is the most Norwegian-sounding with a bit of a “Halling”-feel in rhythm. It is the most virtuoso part of the whole concerto and gives the violinist a big challenge to make it sound effortless. The ending of the concerto is as unusual as the format; it ends in peaceful quietness and gives the audience a chance to breathe out after 32 mins of music.

After many years of composing, Borgström became a music critic and was very respected and feared for his sharp pen. It is said about him he was a humble servant of the art and always listening within to music. But there was a lot of fire and passion in his music, a constant fight of unsolved thoughts and questions as well as a bitterness and soreness. His compositions calls upon reflection and a quest to look into the deepest of ones´s soul. The music´s ability to express thoughts was something Borgstöm firmly believed in. 

After Borgström’s death in 1925 the concerto was completely forgotten and today I am on something of a mission to help do my part in bringing this composer’s music back to life. Being able to record it with the Wiener Symphoniker / Vienna Symphony Orchestra was a fantastic opportunity I am so grateful for. My big wish is that many people will play this concerto and continue to bring life to Borgström´s music.

Listen to the recording with Eldbjørg Hemsing and Wiener Symphoniker

Sheet music of Hjalmar Borgström: Violinkonsert i G-dur

Briefly about Eldbjørg Hemsing

A champion of Norway’s rich musical tradition, Eldbjørg Hemsing has been a household name inher native country since childhood and made her solo debut with the Bergen Philharmonic at the age of 11. After winning various international competitions and prizes at the age of 18 her desire was to continue intensive studies with Boris Kuschnir in Vienna, during which time she fine-tuned her performance-style and absorbed a wide-range of repertoire ranging from Bach, Beethoven, Bartok to Tan Dun. Together with Tan Dun she has collaborated on numerous projects in both Europe and Asia and has most recently premiered and recorded composer’s new violin concerto “Fire Ritual – A Musical Ritual for Victims of Wars”, together with the Oslo Philharmonic.

Her upcoming engagements in the 2019 / 20 season include her début with the Argovia Philharmonic, Orchestra TON at Lincoln Center NY, Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Calgary Philharmonic, Slovene Philharmonic, as well as the re-engagements with orchestras in Europe and Asia. Eldbjørg Hemsing will furthermore perform the Chinese, Swiss, Canadian and German premiere of the forgotten Borgström violin concerto. With recitals Eldbjørg Hemsing also makes her debut in the prestigious ElbPhilharmonie Hamburg as well as at the Dresdner Festspiele and Stiftung Mozarteum Salzburg. Eldbjørg Hemsing plays a 1754 G. B. Guadagnini violin on kind loan from the Dextra Musica Foundation.

Review: GRIEG VIOLINSONATEN by Online Merker (DE)

CD GRIEG VIOLINSONATEN – Eldbjørg Hemsing, Simon Trpčeski; BIS

Eldbjørg Hemsing, Simon Trpčeski Grieg: The Violin Sonatas BIS, VÖ 6.3. 2020 Edvard Grieg: Sonate Nr. 1in F-Dur, Op. 8 Sonate Nr.2 in G-Dur, Op. 13 Sonate Nr. 3 in C-Moll, Op. 45
Eldbjørg Hemsing: Homecoming (2019)

Eldbjørg Hemsing: Ahnenforschung mit Edvard Grieg Auf ihrem neuen Album, das am 6.3.2020 bei BIS erscheint, folgt Eldbjørg den Spuren ihres Ururgroßvaters, der einst Edvard Grieg zu einem seiner bekanntesten Werke inspirierte.

Wer wie Eldbjørg Hemsing zu den renommiertesten Botschafterinnen der norwegischen Musikkultur gehört, kommt an Edvard Grieg nicht vorbei – als Leitfigur der norwegischen Romantik ist der Komponist noch heute zentral für das musikalische Selbstverständnis des Landes. Dass Hemsing für ihr kommendes Album Grieg-Sonaten einspielte, hat jedoch auch einen weitaus persönlicheren, biografischen Hintergrund. 1848 reiste Griegs Assistent Ludvig Mathias Lindeman durch Norwegen, um für seinen Arbeitgeber besonders schöne und interessante Volksmelodien zu recherchieren. In Valdres, dem Heimattal der Hemsing-Familie, traf er dabei auf Anders Nielsen Pelesteinbakken, Eldbjørg Hemsings Ururgroßvater. Dieser wies Lindeman auf ein Melodiefragment hin, das Grieg schließlich scheinbar so inspirierte, dass er es zum Thema der berühmten Ballade (Op. 24) machte.

Gute 170 Jahre später präsentiert nun Eldbjørg Hemsing ihre Interpretation von Griegs drei Sonaten für Geige und Klavier. Die Werke gelten als repräsentativ für verschiedene Schaffensphasen Griegs und entstanden über einen Zeitraum von über zwanzig Jahren. Besonders in der zweiten Sonate eröffnet sich dem Hörer Griegs Anliegen, die nationale Klangkultur seines Heimatlandes musikalisch abzubilden, u.a. durch an Bauerntänze angelehnte Sequenzen –, ideales Material für Eldbjørg Hemsing, die sich seit langem leidenschaftlich für den Erhalt der folkloristischen Musiktradition Norwegens einsetzt. Auch auf vergangenen Veröffentlichungen wählte Hemsing deshalb Komponisten wie Antonín Dvořák und Hjalmar Borgström, die entweder starke Bande zu Norwegen oder zur Volksmusik ihrer Heimatkultur pflegten. Wer also könnte eine geeignetere und authentischere GriegInterpretin sein als Hemsing? Den Grieg-Sonaten zur Seite gestellt hat die Violinistin die Eigenkomposition „Homecoming“, die auf einer Volksmelodie aus Valdres basiert –, auch als Entsprechung dafür, welch persönlichen Stellenwert die neue Einspielung für sie einnimmt. Mit dem Pianisten Simon Trpčeski holte sich Hemsing darüber hinaus einen starken musikalischen Partner ins Boot, seines Zeichens Nationalkünstler seiner Heimat Mazedoniens und ebenfalls für sein Interesse an traditioneller Volksmusik bekannt.

Written by: Online Merker

Die norwegische Geigerin Eldbjørg Hemsing und der mazedonische Pianist Simon Trpčeski nehmen sich auf ihrem neuen Album der drei Violinsonaten von Edvard Grieg an. In einem Zeitraum von über 20 Jahren (1865-1886) entstanden, repräsentieren diese Duosonaten unterschiedliche Schaffensperioden und künstlerische Aspekte des Komponisten. Die frühe Sonate in F-Dur des 22-jährigen Grieg wurde vom Kollegen Niels W. Gade zwar gelobt, allerdings fehlen der Musik noch jenes Wissen um die tiefsten Aspekte der Seele und jene individuell charakterisierten polaren Klangwelten, die den späten Grieg auszeichnen. Die Musik scheint direkt einer nordischen Landschaft entsprungen. Dieser unbeschwert, melodisch frische Spaziergang über Wiesen und Felder, von Blume zu Blume, erzielt in der lebendigen Wiedergabe durch Hemsing/Trpčeski eine Wirkung wie ein durchkomponiertes Lieder- und Balladenalbum ohne Gesang. Positiv fällt sofort die Augenhöhe in der Ausdruckskraft der beiden Solisten auf. Der passionierte Zugriff und das glasklare Spiel des Pianisten tragen maßgeblich dazu bei, dass sich die Geigerin in ihrem Spiel wie der sprichwörtliche Fisch im Wasser bewegen kann. Das stimmungsvolle überschwängliche bis verträumte Allegro molto vivace gibt Gelegenheit, virtuos loszulegen, aber auch empfindsam der romantischen Grundanlage des Werks freien Raum zu lassen.

Die Sonate in G-Dur wurde im Sommer 1867 geschrieben. Ob sie eine Liebeserklärung an Griegs Frau Nina Hagerup war oder generell als ein Hymnus auf die Hochzeitsfeiern des ländlichen Norwegens gehört werden soll, sei dahingestellt. Folklore und Tänze dominieren jedenfalls diese Sonate, was den berühmt berüchtigten Wiener Kritiker Eduard Hanslick dazu verleitete, Grieg als „Mendelssohn im Robbenfell“ zu bezeichnen. Grieg wählte einen bekannten Volkstanz namens Springdans als Modell für den ersten und den letzten Satz, dazwischen gibt es melancholischere Seiten zu erkunden. Norwegen stand damals unter dänischer Herrschaft und das nationale Element in der Musik zu pflegen, war ein in Europa weit verbreitetes Phänomen. Dennoch erzählt Griegs Werk pointiert überdies von den Einflüssen, die Beethoven und Schumann offenbar auf sein Schaffen bewirkt haben. 

Was zudem auffällt, ist die enorme kompositorische  Entwicklung, die Grieg in den beiden Jahren seit dem Erstling durchlebt hat. Wesentlich komplexer, differenzierter in der Atmosphäre und den lautmalerisch entwickelten Stimmungen, folgen auch die beiden Interpreten voller Elan dieser kurvigen Spur. Faszinierend ist das traumwandlerische Miteinander von Eldbjørg Hemsing und Simon Trpčeski in Dynamik und Tempo, das Ballabgeben und -aufnehmen, das kunstreiche Dribbeln, die gestische Lebendigkeit ihrer Interaktion.

1886, als höchst erfolgreicher Komponist, Pianist und Dirigent, setzte sich Grieg noch einmal mit dieser kammermusikalischen Form auseinander. Inspiriert von der jungen italienischen Geigerin Teresina Tua, entstand die reifste und interessanteste der drei Sonaten, diesmal in c-Moll. Wiederum ist die rhythmische Kraft des Spiels, die Eleganz und Verinnerlichung des Tons zu konstatieren. Letztlich aber sind vor allem die zahllosen hier farblich dunkleren Abschattierungen zu bewundern, die die beiden Solisten voller Finesse aus den Noten zeichnen. Trotz des intimen, in keiner Faser aufdringlichen Duktus’ der Sonate stellen sich verblüffende orchestrale Effekte ein.

Wer diese meisterlichen kammermusikalischen Edelsteine noch nicht kennt, kann mit diesen magisch schönen Interpretationen sein Glück versuchen.

Written by: Dr. Ingobert Waltenberger, Online Merker

Eldbjørg Hemsing with new recording release ‘Grieg – The Violin Sonatas’

Credits: Photography by Nikolaj Lund

Following the acclaimed recordings of concertos by Borgström and Shostakovich, Dvořák and Suk, and by Tan Dun, Eldbjørg Hemsing is following in the footsteps of her great-great-grandfather, who once inspired Edvard Grieg to compose one of his most famous works. Joint by Macedonian pianist Simon Trpčeski, Eldbjørg is embarks the journey of Grieg violin sonatas on her latest release on BIS Records.

As a celebrated ambassador of Norwegian cultural heritage, Eldbjørg Hemsing was always going to turn to Edvard Grieg eventually – a composer who is central to both Norwegian music history and the Romantic era in general. Hemsing’s new recording of Grieg’s three violin sonatas on BIS Records also has a much more personal biographic background, however.  

In 1848, Ludvig Mathias Lindeman received funding from the Collegium academicum of Christiania (Oslo) University to collect folk tunes for Edvard Grieg. During his travels across Norway, he stayed in Valdres and met Hemsing’s great-great-grandfather Anders Nielsen Pelesteinbakken, who sang a tune to him. Lindeman noted it down and Grieg later found it in the collection. The small fragment of the folk tune must have caught the composer’s attention and he subsequently used the melody as the inspiration and main theme of one of his greatest works for solo piano, the Ballade, Op. 24

Over 170 years later, Eldbjørg Hemsing is presenting her own interpretation of Grieg’s three sonatas for violin and piano. The sonatas are considered to be representative of different stages in Grieg’s artistic development and were composed over a period of 20 years. The second violin sonata can be seen as one of Grieg’s great successes in capturing the musical identity of his native country, particularly in the sequences based on peasants’ dances. Because of her passion for preserving Norway’s rich folk music heritage – as demonstrated in her previous projects such as the second ever recording of Hjalmar Borgström’s violin concerto – Hemsing was keen to explore the compositions of her famous fellow countryman, who so profoundly shaped the Norwegian cultural identity. 

Alongside the Grieg sonatas, Eldbjørg Hemsing is also presenting her first original composition „Homecoming – Varitations on the folk tune from Valdres“ as a testament to the personal significance of this new recording and its history. Moreover, in pianist Simon Trpčeski Hemsing has found a strong musical partner, an internationally acclaimed artist praised for celebrating the rich folk traditions of his own native country, Macedonia.  

Grieg Violin Sonatas will be available exclusively on Apple Music from February 21st 2020. The album will be released globally from March 6th 2020 on all streaming platforms as well as in physical format in your closest CD shop.

Grieg Recording praised by Süddeutsche Zeitung (DE)

Eldbjørg Hemsing’s new recording release Grieg Violin Sonatas together with the acclaimed Macedonian pianist Simon Trčeski on BIS Records received a praising review by Harald Eggebrecht in the Süddeutsche Zeitung´s Klassikkolumne.

“The violin tone of the young Norwegian Eldbjørg Hemsing has something spacious, immediate, unseen, nothing pretentious about it. This goes wonderfully with the three violin sonatas by Edvard Grieg. Hemsing and her piano partner Simon Trčeski do not doubt for a second the quality, intensity, imagination and touching beauty of this music, which is pulsating with a sense of landscape, natural sensations and passion. One can really say that [Eldbjørg] plays so brilliantly and convincingly in her “mother tongue” that it must captivate everyone. The violinist’s joy in inventing music is demonstrated by her fine variations on a folk tune.”

Read full Klassikkolumne from January 20th 2020

Grieg Violin Sonatas will be available exclusively on Apple Music from February 21st 2020. The album will be released globally from March 6th 2020 on all streaming platforms as well as in physical format in your closest CD shop.

Review: Dvořák & Suk Recording in Concerti (DE)

Effortless Intensity

Eckhard Weber | Concerti | 8. November 2018

She practically grew up with this work, she says. Indeed, young violinist Eldbjørg Hemsing feels noticeably at home in Dvořák’s Violin Concerto. The way she makes her instrument sing with an amazingly nuanced and beguiling tone full of vibrancy has compelling intensity. Nothing sounds laboured here, everything seems to happen spontaneously in this music. The Antwerp Symphony Orchestra under Alan Buribayev is extremely present and sensitive in this interaction and unfolds a tremendously broad spectrum of colours. The folkloristically inspired finale of the Violin Concerto impresses with light-footed verve and shimmering airiness. A new benchmark recording has been achieved here in every respect. The longingly agitated modernity of the fantasy of Dvořák’s pupil and son-in-law Josef Suk with its subtle shades and surprising changes additionally shows the great potential of Hemsing and her colllaborators.

Review: Dvořák&Suk Recording in Süddeutsche (DE)

“…mit der 28 Jahre alten Eldbjørg Hemsing begeistert nun wieder eine junge Geigerin aus Norwegen. Hemsing ist nicht nur eine feinsinnige und kluge Interpretin, sie entlockt ihrer Guadagnini auch einen sehr persönlichen, unverwechselbaren Geigenton. Zart, intim und filigran wirkt er im Kern, dabei aber selbst im gehauchten Piano noch sinnlich und klangvoll.”

Julia Spinola | 2. Oktober 2018 | Süddeutsche Zeitung

Es muss etwas Verzauberndes in den nordischen Fjorden und Berglandschaften liegen. Nachdem die bereits mehrfach preisgekrönte Vilde Frang die internationalen Podien erobert hat, begeistert mit der 28 Jahre alten Eldbjørg Hemsing nun wieder eine junge Geigerin aus Norwegen. Mit Musik des weitgehend unbekannten norwegischen Komponisten Hjalmar Borgström hatte sie im April ihr Debüt gegeben. Auch auf ihrer zweiten CD meidet sie jetzt die ausgetretenen Pfade und spielt neben Antonín Dvořáks Violinkonzert die selten zu hörende Fantasie in g-Moll für Violine und Orchester von Dvořáks Schwiegersohn Josef Suk. Hemsing ist nicht nur eine feinsinnige und kluge Interpretin, sie entlockt ihrer Guadagnini auch einen sehr persönlichen, unverwechselbaren Geigenton. Zart, intim und filigran wirkt er im Kern, dabei aber selbst im gehauchten Piano noch sinnlich und klangvoll. Im leidenschaftlichen Forte, etwa im Eröffnungsthema des Dvořák-Konzerts, beginnt dieser eindringlich singende Ton irisierend zu leuchten. Mit ein wenig Fantasie hört man hier den großen David Oistrach heraus, dessen Schüler Boris Kuschnir Hemsings Lehrer war.

DEBUT CD REVIEW IN DEUTSCHLANDFUNK

Norwegian Discovery – Hemsing plays Borgström

Norwegian violinist Eldbjørg Hemsing shows courage. On her debut recording she performs a violin concerto of Hjalmar Borgström, which is almost not known, and one of Shostakovich, on which famous colleagues have overstretched themselves. But Eldbjørg Hemsing already in her first attempt succeeds with grandiosity.

Christoph Vratz | Deutschlandfunk | 3. Juni 2018

Eine Sinfonie von Joachim Kaiser? Eine Klaviersonate von Karl Schumann oder Ulrich Schreiber? Eine Kantate von Eleonore Büning oder Manuel Brug? Was uns heutzutage in der Literatur noch vergleichsweise häufig begegnet, dass Kritiker selbst zu Autoren werden, bildet in der Musik die Ausnahme. Dafür muss man schon zu Robert Schumann, Hector Berlioz oder Claude Debussy zurückgehen. Doch auch für sie gilt: Sie wurden und werden vor allem als Komponisten wahrgenommen, und erst in zweiter oder dritter Linie als Musikkritiker. Bei Hjalmar Borgström hingegen ist das anders. Von 1907 bis zu seinem Tod 1925 schrieb er in seiner norwegischen Heimat Musikkritiken und wurde damit zu einer nationalen Instanz. Das Komponieren geriet für ihn mehr und mehr zum “Nebenbei”. Umso erstaunlicher, dass er nebenbei 1914 ein Violinkonzert schreibt.

Allegro con spirito, so hat Borgström das Finale zu seinem Violinkonzert überschrieben. Die Geige eröffnet furios. Dann klinkt sich das Orchester ein und bereitet den Boden für die weitere Gestaltung des Eingangsthemas: Es dominiert pure Spiellust, halb ungarisch “alla zingarese”, halb im Sinne der norwegischen Fiddle-Tradition.

Komponist mit eigenem Kopf und ohne nationale Scheuklappen

Erinnert dieser Beginn des Finalsatzes nicht ein wenig an das Violinkonzert von Johannes Brahms? Die Intervalle bei der Sologeige, die ungezügelte Spielfreude? Originär norwegisch klingt das jedenfalls nicht. Dafür gibt es biographische Gründe. Denn Borgström hat vorwiegend in Deutschland, ab 1887 in Leipzig und ab 1890 in Berlin studiert, wo er in Ferruccio Busoni einen prominenten Fürsprecher fand. Borgström selbst war fasziniert von der Macht der Programmmusik im Sinne eines Franz Liszt und auch von der Klangsprache Richard Wagners. Wieder zurück in Norwegen war Borgströms Musik nur wenig Erfolg beschieden. Das lag sicher auch daran, dass sie eben kein spezifisch norwegisches Idiom aufweist wie bei Edvard Grieg. Auch Grieg hatte in Deutschland studiert, wollte aber in Norwegen eine nationale Tonsprache etablieren. Genau das wollte Borgström nicht. Er wählte einen eigenen Weg. Sein Œuvre ist insgesamt, mit je zwei Opern und Sinfonien, wenigen Konzerten und Solowerken, eher schmal.

Erst ein Mal, nämlich im Jahr 2008, ist Borgströms Violinkonzert auf CD dokumentiert worden, mit Jonas Båtstrand, dem Sinfonieorchester der Norrlandsoperan und Terje Boye Hansen am Pult. Jetzt liegt das Werk in einer Neueinspielung vor. Sie übertrifft die ältere Version deutlich. Dabei handelt es sich um die Debüt-CD der norwegischen Geigerin Eldbjørg Hemsing. Schon als Fünfjährige hat sie mit ihrer Schwester vor der Königsfamilie ihres Heimatlandes konzertiert. Mit elf Jahren trat sie erstmals mit den Philharmonikern aus Bergen auf. Mit 22 erfolgte ihr internationaler Durchbruch, als sie sich bei der Friedensnobelpreisverleihung in Oslo präsentierte. Studiert hat Hemsing unter anderem in Wien. Die Noten zu Borgströms Konzert bekam sie bereits vor einigen Jahren geschenkt, doch blieben sie zunächst unbeachtet in einer Ecke liegen. Als die Geigerin dann doch einen genaueren Blick wagte, war sie schnell entflammt. “Was für eine fantastisch schöne, romantische Musik, und dabei auch noch gut spielbar”, so wird Hemsing in der Wochenzeitung “Die Zeit” zitiert. Die Wiener Symphoniker unter Olari Elts eröffnen dieses Violinkonzert, und nach nur wenigen Takten tritt bereits die Sologeige hinzu, anders als in den gewichtigen Traditions-Konzerten von Beethoven und Brahms. Auch wenn der Einsatz der Pauke am Beginn doch ein bisschen an das Beethoven-Konzert erinnert.

Die Tempi der Sätze zwei und drei sind in beiden vorliegenden Einspielungen nahezu gleich. Nur im ersten Satz sind Eldbjørg Hemsing und das Wiener Orchester etwas langsamer unterwegs, dafür mit ungleich klarerem Gestus. Die Übergänge gelingen fließend und natürlich, die Steigerungen organisch. Hemsings Ton leuchtet hell, aber nicht grell oder vordergründig brillant. Sie spielt durchaus mit Schmelz, aber frei von Kitsch. Wenn im Mittelteil des ersten Satzes die Musik immer dramatischere Züge annimmt, wenn Sologeige und Orchester sich mehr und mehr in einen Disput steigern, behauptet sich Hemsing geradezu kühn – mit Kraft und gleichzeitig mit einem flammenden Ton.

Top-Geigerin mit großer Klangfarbenpalette

Eldbjørg Hemsing spielt auf einer Guadagnini-Geige aus dem Jahr 1754, die ihr eine Stiftung zur Verfügung gestellt hat. Das Instrument ist, selten genug, fast noch im Originalzustand. Man muss sich nicht allzu weit aus dem Fenster lehnen, um zu behaupten, dass man von Hemsing künftig noch einiges hören wird. Denn wie sie im langsamen Satz mit warmen, fast bronzenen Klangfarben arbeitet, um zwischenzeitlich mit größter Selbstverständlichkeit den Ton ins Silbrige zu verlagern, das zeugt von großer Klasse und verspricht einiges für ihre Zukunft.

Was diese Einspielung so besonders macht, ist die Selbstverständlichkeit, mit der Eldbjørg Hemsing die leisen und sehr leisen Passagen meistert. Dann lässt sie ihre Geige wundervoll singen: geheimnisvoll und poetisch, arios und tänzerisch. unterstützt durch die zarten Zupfer der Streicher und kurze Intermezzi der Klarinette.

Vieles an dieser neuen Einspielung ist ungewöhnlich, vor allem das Programm. Denn eine direkte Verbindungslinie zwischen Hjalmar Borgström und Dmitri Schostakowitsch gibt es nicht. Als der Norweger 1925 mit 61 Jahren starb, war sein russischer Kollege erst noch auf dem Sprung zu einer großen Karriere. Schostakowitschs erstes Violinkonzert entstand 1948, zu einer Zeit, als die stalinistische Partei sein Schaffen mit Argus-Augen überwachte. Was nicht mit ihren Richtlinien konform ging, wurde abgelehnt, und der Komponist hatte Repressalien zu fürchten. Daher erfolgte die Premiere dieses Konzertes erst im Jahr 1955 mit David Oistrach als Solist.

Auch in diesem Konzert bilden Geigerin Eldbjørg Hemsing, die Wiener Symphoniker und Olari Elts eine Einheit. Das zeigt besonders der schroffe Gegensatz zwischen dem dunklen, einleitenden Notturno und dem bizarren Scherzo. Wie hier die säuselnden Bläser, Bassklarinette und Flöte, mit den schroffen Akzenten der Solovioline kontrastieren, das verrät Schärfe, Bitternis und, bezeichnend für Schostakowitsch, beißenden Humor. Das gilt in gleichem Maße für die sich unmittelbar anschließende Passage, wenn die Geige das Kommando übernimmt und die Streicher hinzutreten.

Verträumt bis bärbeißig – Schostakowitschs erstes Violinkonzert

Eldbjørg Hemsing ist gewiss kein musikalischer Muskelprotz, dem es in erster Linie auf äußere Effekte ankommt. Die Norwegerin erweist sich als sensible Künstlerin, die sich und ihren Ton immer wieder genauer Prüfung unterzieht. Daher findet sie für jede Stimmung einen adäquaten Ausdruck, ob verträumt und nach innen gekehrt oder bärbeißig und virtuos. Ihre technischen und musikalischen Fähigkeiten gehen Hand in Hand. Wenn es, wie im Finalsatz von Schostakowitschs erstem Violinkonzert, schnell zugeht, spiegelt diese Aufnahme den experimentellen Geist des Komponisten. Doch trotz der vielen, teils schnellen rhythmischen und dynamischen Umschwünge: Hemsings Geige klirrt nie, auch geraten die kurzen Linien nicht aus dem Fokus. Die Solistin weiß genau, wo sie hinmöchte und wie sie die Höhepunkte ansteuern muss, um deren ganze Wirkung so spontan und natürlich wie möglich herauszuarbeiten. Das ist eindrucksvoll und rundet den sehr positiven, stellenweise herausragenden Gesamteindruck dieser neuen Produktion ab.

Heute haben wir Ihnen die Debüt-CD der Geigerin Eldbjørg Hemsing vorgestellt. Mit den Wiener Symphonikern und Olari Elts hat sie Violinkonzerte von Hjalmar Borgström und Dmitri Schostakowitsch aufgenommen, erschienen ist sie als SACD beim schwedischen Label BIS.

ELDBJØRG HEMSING IN BR-KLASSIK KLICKKLACK

Portrait of Eldbjørg Hemsing in “KlickKlack” | BR-KLASSIK | 7th May 2018

“KlickKlack”, music magazine for Classical Music, Jazz and good Pop Music, is the only format in which two world stars – cellist Sol Gabetta an percussionist Martin Grubinger – are giving the TV viewers a very close experience on how professional artist work, rehearse and perform. The imagery is modern, the camera extremely subjective.

Eldbjørg Hemsing has been guest of Martin Grubinger in the BR-KLASSIK “KlickKlack” feature from 7th May 2018, beside Michael Sanderling, Chief Conductor of Dresden Philharmonic, Gautier Capuçon, French cellist, and pianist Jens Thomas.

DEBUT CD REVIEW IN KLASSIK HEUTE

Credits: Photography by Nikolaj Lund

“9/10 Stars – Eldbjørg Hemsing succeeds with a convincing debut which makes curious for further releases of this young artist.”

Norbert Florian Schuck | Klassik Heute | 18th May 2018

Es ist immer wieder erfreulich, wenn junge Interpreten ihr CD-Debüt dazu nutzen, Werke zu präsentieren, die man nicht alle Tage zu hören bekommt. So hat sich die norwegische Geigerin Eldbjørg Hemsing entschieden, ihre erste Aufnahme als Konzertsolistin mit dem 1914 uraufgeführten Violinkonzert ihres Landsmannes Hjalmar Borgström zu eröffnen.

Im Beiheft erfährt man, dass Borgström – er schrieb seinen Namen demonstrativ mit ö statt ø – sich für die zeitgenössische deutsche Musik stark machte und bei Edvard Grieg, der ihm Desinteresse an norwegischer Nationalidiomatik vorwarf, auf Unverständnis stieß. Nun rekurriert Borgströms Konzert tatsächlich nicht offensiv auf Volksmusiktopoi, doch klingt das Werk weder nach Wagner, noch nach Brahms, und schon gar nicht nach Strauss oder Reger. Stattdessen hört man deutlich, dass Borgström ein Generationsgenosse Halvorsens und Sindings ist. Mittels einer reichen Klangfarbenpalette – immer wieder begegnen interessante Instrumentationseinfälle – entfaltet der Komponist unter weitgehendem Verzicht auf handwerkliche Kunststücke schlichte, gesangliche Melodien, aus deren Wendungen man, Grieg zum Trotz, durchaus auf einen Skandinavier schließen kann. Für das Soloinstrument ist das Konzert anspruchs- und wirkungsvoll geschrieben, ohne ein Virtuosenstück zu sein. Sein introvertierter Charakter zeigt sich nicht zuletzt darin, dass sowohl der Kopfsatz, als auch das Finale, die beide nur mäßig schnell sind, leise enden. Die Interpretation, die ihm durch Eldbjørg Hemsing und die Wiener Symphoniker unter Olari Elts zuteil wird, dürfe sich gut dazu eignen, dem schönen Werk Freunde zu gewinnen. Der kantable Gestus des Stückes kommt Hemsing offenbar entgegen. Sie besitzt ein sicheres Gespür für die abwechslungsreiche Gestaltung wie für die Verknüpfung der einzelnen Phrasen, so dass in ihren Händen die Musik stets in angenehmem Fluss bleibt. Vom Vibrato macht sie dabei reichlichen, aber nicht übermäßigen Gebrauch.

Über ihren Lehrer Boris Kuschnir ist Eldbjørg Hemsing Enkelschülerin David Oistrachs. So verwundert es nicht, dass sie sich dem Oistrach gewidmeten Violinkonzert Nr. 1 von Dmitrij Schostakowitsch besonders verbunden fühlt und dieses als zweites Stück auf der CD erscheint. Auch dem von Borgströms Idiom sehr verschiedenen Stil Schostakowitschs erweist sie sich als vollauf gewachsen. Namentlich zeigt sich dies in den raschen Sätzen des Werkes, in denen die Vorzüge ihres Spiels auch bei forscherer Artikulation deutlich werden.

Olari Elts lässt die Wiener Symphoniker in beiden Violinkonzerten als verlässlichen Partner agieren, dessen Spiel mit dem der Solistin trefflich harmoniert. Auch er ist ein Musiker, der es versteht, die einzelnen Klänge in große Bögen einzubetten. Hervorheben möchte ich diesbezüglich den Beginn der Passacaglia im Schostakowitsch-Konzert, der übrigens – wie auch der Anfang des Borgström-Konzerts – zeigt, dass die Wiener Symphoniker über einen ausgezeichneten Pauker verfügen.

Das Klangbild der Aufnahme hält weitgehend mit der Qualität der Darbietungen Schritt. Das Verhältnis von Soloinstrument und Orchester ist insgesamt ausgewogen, was allerdings auch den Kompositionen zuzuschreiben ist: Aller stilistischen Unterschiede ungeachtet eint Borgström und Schostakowitsch ihre Vorliebe zu durchsichtiger Instrumentation mit prägnanten Klangmischungen, so dass selbst bei deutlicher Fokussierung der Aufnahme auf das Soloinstrument – wie hier geschehen – die orchestralen Effekte nicht an Wirkung einbüßen. Einzig in der fugierten Durchführung von Schostakowitschs Scherzo tritt die Violine etwas zu deutlich hervor. Hier wäre eine stärkere Akzentuierung der jeweils themenführenden Instrumente wünschenswert gewesen. Den insgesamt sehr guten Eindruck, den die CD hinterlässt, schmälert dies jedoch kaum. Eldbjørg Hemsing ist ein überzeugendes Debüt gelungen, auf weitere Veröffentlichungen der jungen Künstlerin darf man neugierig sein.

DEBUT CD REVIEW IN THE STRAD

“…Eldbjørg Hemsing […] makes a good start with this powerful performance. A gorgeous, open-hearted piece, full of flowing lyricism, to which she brings warm and beautiful playing… Hemsing weaves steadily and unfussily, but with increasing emotional intensity. The finale scuttles along brilliantly.”

Tim Homfray | The Strad | 9th May 2018

The Norwegian composer Hjalmar Borgström was famous in his day but quickly fell into obscurity, his music bedded in the Germanic 19th century and considered old-fashioned and ‘not Norwegian enough’ at the beginning of the 20th. His compatriot Eldbjørg Hemsing wants to bring him back to notice, and makes a good start with this powerful performance of his 1914 Violin Concerto.

It is a gorgeous, open-hearted piece, full of flowing lyricism, to which she brings warm and beautiful playing. Her phrasing is supple and nuanced, flecked with neat little touches of vibrato and variations of dynamic. The central Adagio is far-ranging, moving from musing opening to a jaunty central section, and on to something more torridly passionate before leading straight into the dancing finale. Hemsing deftly handles all the transitions.

It is a bit of a gear-change from Borgström to austere Shostakovich (Bruch would have worked nicely). Hemsing weaves steadily and unfussily, but with increasing emotional intensity, to the climactic double-stops of the first movement. In the Scherzo she plays with an edge of violence, biting and snapping. The orchestra matches her vivid playing, but the recording sets it in the background, in a resonant acoustic. She is as fine in the third movement as the first in progressively ratcheting up the tension before easing down into the cadenza, which in its turn grows steadily to a searing climax. The finale scuttles along brilliantly.

DEBUT CD REVIEW IN PIZZICATO

“PIZZICATO SUPERSONIC AWARD: An excellent interpretation of Shostakovich’s first Violin Concerto is paired with the almost unknown, yet interesting concerto written by Norwegian composer Hjalmar Borgström, which equally experiences a more than adequate performance.”

Uwe Krusch | Pizzicato | 7th May 2018

Eröffnet wird diese CD mit dem Violinkonzert von Hjalmar Bjorgström. Wie so viele Norweger hatte er seine Ausbildung in Deutschland, in seinem Fall in Leipzig erhalten. Fand er auch das Studium an und für sich wenig als bereichernd, so inspirierte ihn die reiche Musikkultur, weswegen er lange verweilte. Als er dann endlich nach Norwegen zurückkehrte, war er so in dieser Welt verfangen, dass er dem hochromantischen Stil treu blieb und sich auch nicht darum bemühte, Elemente der norwegischen Musik in sein Wirken aufzunehmen. Das registrierte Grieg mit Verwunderung.

Das Violinkonzert von Borgström ist also diesem romantischen Stil verbunden und, wie der neutrale Titel anzeigt, auch ohne programmatischen Hintergrund, wenn es auch einen narrativen Charakter hat.

Klassisch ist die dreisätzige Form und man hat immer wieder den Eindruck, alte Bekannte wie Brahms, Mendelssohns, Schumann zu treffen, da es die Sprache seiner berühmten Vorgänger intuitiv übernimmt. Dennoch kann man ihm kein Plagiat vorwerfen. Das Stück entwickelt durchaus einen eigenen Charme und ist handwerklich nach allen Regeln meisterhaft gestaltet. Nur hinkt es den neuen musikalischen Entwicklungen zur Entstehungszeit 1914 hinterher.

Eldbjorg Hemsing kann geigerisch aus dem Vollen schöpfen. Ihr Spiel strahlt Souveränität aus, es ist temperamentvoll und bietet dem Hörer einen klaren und schlackenlosen Ton. Dadurch kann sie diese Rarität im Repertoire so ausleuchten, dass das vielleicht ein wenig biedere Werk trotzdem erstrahlt und man mit Interesse bei der Stange bleibt. Ihre hochentwickelten gestalterischen Fertigkeiten setzt sie danach für eine durch und durch überzeugende Darstellung von Shostakovichs erstem Konzert ein. Dieses eine breite Palette von Stimmungen abbildende Werk durchdringt sie mit derartiger Tiefe der Darstellung, dass es eine reine Freude ist. Besonders die Passacaglia lebt von der auch die kleinsten Nuancen auslotenden und herauskitzelnden Ruhe, bevor sie die Burlesque kunstvoll ausgetanzt.

Gemeinsam mit den galant zupackenden Wiener Symphonikern unter Olari Elts werden alle Farben der beiden Werke effektvoll zur Geltung gebracht. Die ausgezeichnete Technik der Aufnahme vervollständigt die positiv zu benennenden Punkte.

DEBUT CD REVIEW IN DEN KLASSISKE CD-BLOGGEN

Rating 6/6 Stars: “Eldbjørg Hemsing’s wide spectrum of sound and delicate virtuosity fits this concerto very well. She shows a technique and a virtuosity that is admirable. This recording can in many ways be regarded as Hemsing’s masterpiece – and she has passed this exam with flying colors.”

Trond Erikson | Den Klassiske CD-Bloggen | 7th May 2018

A Masterpiece

These are two widely different violin concertos for which Eldbjørg Hemsing has collaborated with the Vienna Symphony Orchestra. And you are captured by her violin playing, which makes both of these concertos perfect.

Hjalmar Borgström (1864-1925) and his music have in many ways received a new spring in recent years. His opera “Thora on Rimul” and not least the orchestral works “Hamlet” (for piano and orchestra) and “Tanken”, as well as the violin sonata, have helped give Borgström the place he deserves in music history. His music is not “Norwegian” in the sense that he walks in Grieg’s footsteps. He stayed for long periods in Germany and gained much of his inspiration from European music life.

The quality of this “forgotten” concert is very good. And Eldbjørg Hemsing’s wide spectrum of sound and her delicate virtuosity fits this concerto very well. She has a musical timbre range that is impressive, something she greatly utilizes in this violin concerto.

That she knows well and masters the music of Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-1975) is beyond doubt. His first violin concerto is intense with its rhythmic and intense sound colors, and its is undoubtedly a masterpiece.

A number of great violinists have recorded this work – and the first was David Oistrakh, to whom the concerto is dedicated.

Hemsing has studied this work with the Ukrainian musician and Professor Boris Kushnir – a very good choice as she performs this concerto with a solid dose of Eastern European understanding. There is not a single tone that remains anonymous in her interpretation. She shows a technique and a virtuosity that is admirable.

Supporting her, Eldbjørg Hemsing has the very good Vienna Symphony Orchestra, attentively and skilfully led by Estonian conductor Olari Elts.

This recording can in many ways be regarded as Hemsing’s masterpiece – and she has passed this exam with flying colors.

DEBUT CD REVIEW IN RESMUSICA

“…an outstanding artist with a warm tone, accurate and precise playing… Eldbjørg Hemsing gives the second movement, the Scherzo, a bewitching and hypnotic interpretation, unforgettable. The other three movements, in the pure style of the Russian musician, place this perfectly controlled version at the level of the greatest recordings. The Vienna Symphony, conducted by the rigorous and experienced Estonian Olari Elts (born in 1971), shares the outstanding merits and contributes to making this recording a subject of legitimate lust and curiosity.”

Jean-Luc Caron | ResMusica | 1 May 2018

Three decades separate the Borgström and Shostakovich concertos for violin and orchestra, representatives of two irreconcilable, if not contradictory, worlds admirably defended on the BIS label.

Norwegian violinist Eldbjørg Hemsing (born 1990), an outstanding artist with a warm tone, accurate and precise playing, has a very honorable career. Her subtle understanding of music is regularly emphasized. This recording, if necessary, furnishes us with a new proof.

The concerto for violin in G major by his compatriot Hjalmar Borgström (1864-1925), a contemporary of Carl Nielsen, returns to the light. He deserves it amply. The fame of this pupil from Leipzig (where he traveled in 1887), who was an ardent defender of German orchestral music and program music, was eclipsed by the eruption of the new modernity emerging around the First World War. His lack of enthusiasm for Norwegian musical nationalism and its icon Edvard Grieg surely contributed to his marginalization. However, the Kristiania Concerto, which was premiered in 1914, was well received because of its rich and abundant melodic writing, passionate, lyrical, rhapsodic, and some splendidly orchestrated passages. In the Adagio there are a few repetitive steps that are strikingly reminiscent of a section of Samuel Barber’s Violin Concerto (1941)!

Shostakovich’s Concerto for Violin No. 1 in A minor (1948, revised in 1955), written for David Oistrakh and valiantly defended by him (and recorded twice), transports us to another world, fascinating, exuberant and dark, alternately marked by harshness, caricatural dancing and insistent hammering, a concealed confession of the true state of mind of a rebellious and wounded creator. Eldbjørg Hemsing gives the second movement, the Scherzo, a bewitching and hypnotic interpretation, unforgettable. The other three movements, in the pure style of the Russian musician, place this perfectly controlled version at the level of the greatest recordings (David Oistrach, Maxime Shostakovich, EMI, 1972, Lydia Mordkovich, Neeme Jarvi, Chandos, 1989, Yefim Bronfman, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Sony, 2003).

The Vienna Symphony, conducted by the rigorous and experienced Estonian Olari Elts (born in 1971), shares the outstanding merits and contributes to making this recording a subject of legitimate lust and curiosity.

ELDBJØRG HEMSING DEBUT CD REVIEW IN THE ARTS DESK

Credits: Photography by Nikolaj Lund

Classical CDs Weekly: Borgström

“Wonderfully played […], Eldbjørg Hemsing’s dynamism and rich, warm tone exactly what the concerto needs. She’s really impressive.”

Graham Rickson | theartsdesk.com | 28 April 2018

Hjalmar Borgström sounds like the name of a BBC Four gumshoe, a melancholy detective solving crimes in downtown Tromsø. He was actually a Norwegian composer (1864-1925) who, like Grieg, studied in Germany, remaining there for 15 years. Grieg quickly assimilated his technique with native folk music, later expressing dismay at the younger Borgström’s lack of interest in making his music sound specifically Norwegian. His G major Violin Concerto was premiered in 1914. It’s an ambitious, 35-minute work, brimming with ideas, but you can understand why it’s fallen by the wayside. It’s much more German than Nordic in style. Nothing wrong with that, except that we’re talking conservative late 19th century Germany rather than Strauss. There are flashes of brilliance: the soloist enters within seconds after a flurry of timpani, and the lyrical asides are gorgeous. All very attractive (what a superb close the work has!), but nothing especially distinctive. Wonderfully played though, Eldbjørg Hemsing’s dynamism and rich, warm tone exactly what the concerto needs.

Unexpectedly, Hemsing couples it with Shostakovich’s brooding Concerto No. 1. She’s really impressive, sustaining the argument in the chilly Nocturne and suitably snarky in the scherzo. There’s good orchestral support too from Olari Elts and the Wiener Symphoniker, low winds, tuba and percussion making plenty of impact. Hemsing is at her best in the Passacaglia, the temperature rising inexorably to boiling point. The last movement’s adrenalin rush is joyous. Excellent sound, too – an enjoyable disc.

DEBUT CD REVIEW IN RHEINISCHE POST

Musik aus tiefster Geigerseele

The wonderful Violin Concerto in G major op. 14 from 1914 is a real hit, and you can be thankful to the Swedish label BIS for letting the work now appear at its best. The solo part is played by the fabulous young Norwegian Eldbjørg Hemsing: she impresses with a brilliant technique, her tone is bright and soft – and the grandeur of a free violinist soul is enthroned above everything. The 27-year-old artist, of whom there is still a great deal to hear, brings the work, which one can hear wonderfully carefree, so to speak, back into the repertoire. The Wiener Symphoniker, under the direction of Olari Elts, assists masterfully. This SACD is rounded off by a no less impressive performance of the Violin Concerto No. 1 in A minor by Dmitri Shostakovich, which captures the edges and abysses of the music.

Wolfram Goetz | Rheinische Post | 5 Mar 2018:

Die einen kamen aus dem hohen Norden nach Deutschland, um hier tief in die Tradition der klassischen Musik einzudringen und die letzten Weihen zu empfangen. Dann kehrten sie zurück, kümmerten sich um die authentische Musik ihrer Heimat und um die Art, wie sie selbst als Komponisten in dieser nationalmusikalischen Thematik eine eigene und unverwechselbare Stimme fanden. Für Hjalmar Borgstrøm war das nicht der richtige Plan. Der 1864 in Oslo geborene Komponist ging 1887, als 23-Jähriger, nach Leipzig, aber er dachte nicht daran, sich die zentraleuropäischen Errungenschaften alsbald wieder abzuschminken. Er war infiziert von der Macht der Programmmusik, er genoss das volle Programm von Johannes Brahms, Franz Liszt und Richard Wagner und stand einem norwegischen Idiom fern (wie es etwa, selbstverständlich auf wundervollem Niveau, bei Edvard Grieg der Fall gewesen war).

Und als Borgstrøm zurück war in Oslo, da fiel der Erfolg seiner Musik nur matt aus: Man sehnte sich zumal nach dem Ende des Ersten Weltkriegs nach Esprit, nicht nach Erdenschwere. Norwegen schaute nach Frankreich, und Borgstrøm musste sein Geld als Musikkritiker verdienen. In dieser Profession war er allerdings hoch angesehen, er galt als Instanz. Dabei ist das wundervolle Violinkonzert G-Dur op. 14 aus dem Jahr 1914 ein echter Knüller, und man kann dem schwedischen Label BIS dankbar sein, dass er das Werk jetzt in Bestbesetzung hat aufnehmen lassen.

Den Solopart spielt die fabelhafte junge norwegische Eldbjørg Hemsing: Sie prunkt mit einer glänzenden Technik, ihr Ton ist leuchtend, hat Schmelz – und über allem thront die Grandezza einer freien Geigerseele. Die 27-jährige Künstlerin, von der man noch sehr viel hören wird, holt das Werk, das man wunderbar unbeschwert hören kann, sozusagen zurück ins Repertoire. Dabei helfen die Wiener Symphoniker unter Leitung von Olari Elts meisterlich mit.

Abgerundet wird diese SACD durch eine nicht minder beeindruckende, die Kanten und Abgründe der Musik einfangende Wiedergabe des Violinkonzerts Nr. 1 a-Moll von Dmitri Schostakowitsch.

DEBUT CD REVIEW IN RONDO

…with her supreme violinistic ease, sprightly personality and wonderfully clear and pure lyrical tone (2nd movement), the violinist Eldbjørg Hemsing transforms this repertoire rarity into a worthwhile rediscovery or new discovery. Hemsing’s mastery of the entire Shostakovich spectrum, from gloomy bitterness to grotesquely-virtuosic agility, is then demonstrated in her collaboration with the highly committed Wiener Symphoniker.

Rondo | Guido Fischer | 3 Mar 2018:

Der Name Hjalmar Borgström war bis vor kurzem noch dieser typische Fall von „Kenne ich nicht“. Auf dem Cover der Solo-Debüt-CD der aufstrebenden norwegischen Geigerin Eldbjørg Hemsing steht er immerhin über dem von Dmitri Schostakowitsch. Was sofort die Vermutung nährt, dass es sich bei dem No-Name um einen skandinavischen Zeitgenossen des Russen handeln könnte – wenn nicht vielleicht gar um einen wahrscheinlich zu unrecht nie so richtig zum Zug gekommenen Neue Musik-Komponisten. Was die Lebenslinien von Borgström und Schostakowitsch angeht, gab es immerhin Berührungspunkte. Als der Norweger 1925 im Alter von gerade 61 Jahren verstarb, war der russische Kollege mit seinen 19 Jahren schon auf dem Karrieresprung. Ein Mann der zu dieser Zeit bereits mächtig an den Grundfesten rüttelnden Moderne war Borgström aber so gar nicht. Zu diesem Schluss bringt einen sein dreisätziges Violinkonzert G-Dur op. 25, das Hemsing zusammen mit dem 1. Violinkonzert von Schostakowitsch aufgenommen hat.

Das 1914 anlässlich der 100-Jahr-Feier der norwegischen Verfassung entstandene Konzert ist pure Hoch- bis Spätromantik, die ihre Wurzeln nicht etwa in der nordischen Volksmusik hat, sondern in der Tradition Mendelssohns, Schumanns und Brahms‘. Der Grund: Borgström hatte ab 1887 während seines Studiums das Musikleben in Leipzig in vollen Zügen genossen. Dementsprechend begegnet man in seinem Violinkonzert vielen alten Bekannten, zahlreichen Einflüssen und geläufigen Trivialitäten. Doch überraschender Weise kommt dabei keine Sekunde Langeweile auf! Nicht nur, weil sich Borgström hier als fantasievoller Handwerker entpuppt, der die musikalisch scheinbar aus der Zeit gefallenen Ingredienzien äußerst reizvoll recycelt. Auch die Geigerin Eldbjørg Hemsing kann mit ihrer geigerischen Souveränität, ihrem anspringenden Temperament und einem wunderbar klaren und schlackenfreien Kantilenenton (2. Satz) diese Repertoire-Rarität in eine lohnenswerte Wieder- bzw. Neuentdeckung verwandeln. Dass Hemsing aber eben auch das gesamte Schostakowitsch-Spektrum von düsterer Bitternis bis grotesk-virtuoser Gelenkigkeit grandios beherrscht, stellt sie anschließend gemeinsam mit den höchst engagierten Wiener Symphonikern unter Beweis.

DEBUT CD REVIEW IN CRESCENDO

Eldbjørg Hemsing: Der verschollene Norweger

“…jointly with Wiener Symphoniker and Conductor Olari Elts, Eldbjørg Hemsing presents an interpretation which is convincing, rich of colors and personal. With consistently brilliant sound and flexible expression, Eldbjørg Hemsing makes this album absolutely worth listening to.”

Crescendo | Sina Kleinedler | 20 February 2018

Zwei Entdeckungen auf einem Album: Die norwegische Violinistin Eldbjørg Hemsing und das Violinkonzert ihres Landsmannes Hjalmar Borgström (1864–1925). Borgström war zu Beginn des 20. Jahrhunderts als Kritiker und Komponist bekannt. In Vergessenheit geriet seine Musik höchstwahrscheinlich dadurch, dass er sich weigerte, eine typisch skandinavische Klangsprache zu adaptieren – wie Grieg es getan hatte. Dennoch zog das 1914 geschriebenes Violinkonzert Hemsing sofort in seinen Bann, auch weil dessen Klangsprache sie an ihre Heimat erinnerte. Im Kontrast zu Borgströms romantischem Werk steht Dmitri Shostakovichs erstes Violinkonzert. Seine Klangsprache ist weniger pastoral, eher dramatisch und schmerzerfüllt, doch auch hier schafft Hemsing es gemeinsam mit den Wiener Symphonikern und Olari Elts eine überzeugende, farbenreiche und persönliche Interpretation zu präsentieren. Mit durchweg brillierendem Klang und flexiblem Ausdruck macht Eldbjørg Hemsing dieses Album absolut hörenswert.

DEBUT CD REVIEW IN KLASSISKMUSIK

RATING: 6/6 STARS

“… a fabulous discovery … [Hemsing] offers a star performance, technically steady as a mountain goat, bold and assertive where required and sweetly filled like spun sugar in the slow movement… the interpretation of Shostakovich’s first violin concerto is more than superb… this recording is strongly recommended.​”​

Klassiskmusik | Martin Anderson | Oversatt fra engelsk av Mona Levin | 14 February 2018

Forskjellige lands evne til å overse store deler av sin egen kunstarv opphører aldri å overraske – og det gjelder ikke bare Norge. Nesten hvert eneste land med en musikktradisjon utenfor mainstream lukker øynene, eller heller ørene, for den. Jeg kunne sette opp lange lister med franske komponister som ikke blir spilt i Frankrike, skotske komponister som forblir uspilt i Skottland, belgiske komponister som er ukjente i Belgia, spanske …. Du skjønner tegningen.

Det faktum at Norge bruker lang tid på å (gjen)oppdage viktige norske komponister, er altså hverken nytt eller uvanlig. Den mest oversette norske fiolinkonserten er den i d-moll av Catharinus Elling (1858–1942) som ble utgitt i 1918; Arve Tellefsens innspilling fra 1987 avdekket et verk fullt på høyde med det romantiske standardrepertoaret innen fiolinkonserter – Bruch g-moll, Dvořák, Glazunov, Tsjaikovskij osv – og allikevel er det forbløffende nok ikke foretatt noen annen innspilling i løpet av de mellomliggende tre tiår. Tellefsens pionerinnsats, som finnes på YouTube, viser med all mulig tydelighet hvor viktig minneverdige melodier er for at et verk som en fiolinkonsert skal oppnå suksess (lytt etter «Don’t cry for me, Argentina» – Elling var der først!).

Hjalmar Borgstrøms (1864-1925) fiolinkonsert i G-dur fra 1914 er ikke like minneverdig som Ellings (den har atmosfære fremfor sterke melodier), og med sine 36 minutter er den for lang for sitt materiale, men den er en fabelaktig oppdagelse uansett. Den innleder med et varsomt kallerop fra paukene, en dristig, søkende påstand fra solofiolinen besvares av innforståtte treblåsere, og slik folder den 16 minutter lange førstesatsen seg som en rapsodi i fri form, mer som en tankegang i utvikling en i noen tydelig musikalsk form. Den er ofte svært vakker i sin dagdrømming, sporadisk satt opp mot heroisk orkesterkomponering som sterkt antyder friluft – skjønt noe mer generelt nordisk friluft enn spesifikt norsk. Den langsomme Adagio-satsen begynner med en rørende koral-aktig figur i strykere og horn, som nå og da vender tilbake. Paradoksalt, til tross for fravær av hva tyskerne kaller «ørekrypere» i det melodiske materialet, har musikken uansett ekte personlighet. Finalen slår inn med en fengende (endelig!) dans, som viser seg å være hovedtemaet i en rondo, skjønt Borgstrøm vandrer ofte off piste, og denne satsen går i mål etter mer enn 11 minutter. Men selv om musikken ikke har tatt den retteste veien mellom A og B, er utsikten langs ruten aldri mindre enn herlig – og på slutten synes verket bare å bli borte i krattet og forsvinne i noen meloditråder. Hvis Borgstrøms konsert ikke skulle slå an, er det iallfall ikke Eldbjørg Hemsings skyld: hun byr på stjernespill, teknisk stø som en fjellgeit, dristig og påståelig der det kreves, og sødmefylt som spunnet sukker i den langsomme satsen. Den estiske dirigenten Olari Elts og wienersymfonikerne gir formfull, livlig orkesterstøtte.

Deres tolkning av Sjostakovitsj’ første konsert (et pussig verk å sette sammen med Borgstrøm) er greit mer enn fremragende – den mangler noe av det desperate bittet, den ville lidenskapen og tragiske uavvendeligheten som (for eksempel) de som uroppførte den, David Ojstrakh og Jevgenij Mravinskij, fylte den med fra midten på 1950-tallet av. Noe av grunnen er at Hemsing ikke graver dypt nok ned i strengene, slik at solostemmen mangler tyngde. Klarheten i denne innspillingen ligger selvsagt milelangt fra bokseklangen den gang, og hvem ville vel kjøpe denne platen for Sjostakovitj? Jeg ville også foretrukket større engasjement i musikken i Thomas Blocks CD-hefte: han avspiser den dypt bevegende Passacaglia i 3. sats i Sjostakovitsj med tretten ord. Når det gjelder Borgstrøm, anbefales denne innspillingen på det sterkeste.

MUSIKKULTUR – ELDBJØRGS ÆRA

Eldbjørg Hemsing står foran sitt store, internasjonale gjennombrudd. Med seg på reisen har hun en norsk fiolinkonsert som har vært glemt i hundre år.

Publisert 05.02.2018 | Ingvild Amdal Myklebust

Hovedscenen på Nationaltheatret i Oslo har aldri vært større enn den maidagen i 1996. På klakkende bunadsko inntar hun flomlyset sammen med storesøster Ragnhild på åtte. Bak seg aner hun konturene av det tunge sceneteppet og av moren som viser dem riktig neieteknikk. Foran dem venter et bekmørkt folkehav. Hun vet at kongefamilien sitter der ute. Og Wenche Foss som hun møtte i stad. Snart er de framme ved scenekanten. Da skal de løfte opp felene til haka og spille Briskjehauga slik de pleier. Bare en meter igjen nå.

> Weblink to Full Article

ELDBJØRG HEMSING ON NRK KLASSISK

Eldbjørg Hemsing on NRK Klassisk: “My Favorite Music”

Eldbjørg Hemsing in “My Favorite Music” on Norwegian governmental broadcasting station NRK takes us from traditional music in Valdres through classics like Bach and Beethoven up to the collaboration with Chinese composer and Academy Award winner Tan Dun and to a new release of the Violin Concertos by Borgström and Shostakovich.

Eldbjørg Hemsing shares stories that shed light on the music with program director Stein Eide.

The 1h54min radio feature in Norwegian language can be listened to at following weblink:

> Eldbjørg Hemsing – NRK Klassisk “My favourite music”

ELDBJØRG HEMSING IN KLASSISK MAGAZINE

Nordiske Violinkoncerter

Skandinaviske violinister graver i disse år i egen baghave og finder alternativer til de kendte violinkoncerter af Tjajkovskij og Mendelssohn. På den måde er noele romantiske violinkoncerter dukket op i både Denmark, Norge og Sverige, der ikke er til at sta for.

En overraskelse er også violinkoncerten af nordmanden Hjalmar Borgstrøm (1864-1925). Han var en ægte senromanti­ ker, der elskede Wagner og komponerede store orkesterværker. Hans Violinkoncert blev skrevet i 1914, lige inden den gamle verden gik under. Et stykke nordisk romantik, beslægtet med Griegs norske toner, Peterson-Bergers sommerlyrik og Sibelius’ store vidder. Borgstrøm havde en overlegen kompositionsteknik, og det giver hans Violinkoncert en glamourøs karakter. Den måler sig med andre senro­ mantiske koncerter og har potentiale til at smelte hjerter. Og med det iiber-skan- dinaviske komponistnavn ‘Borgstrøm’ fortæller overskriften alle, at her kommer den nordiske lyd!

Koncerten blev indspillet første gang i 2010, men nu kommer Borgstrøms Violinkoncert længere ud, når den norske virtuos Eldbjørg Hemsingtil maj udgiver den på det nordiske plademærke BIS, indspillet sammen med Wiener Symfo­nikerne. »At jeg overhovedet blev klar over, at koncerten fandtes, skyldes dirigenten Terje Boye Hansen«, fortæller Eldbjørg Hemsing.

»Han er en stor forkæmper for musik, som af forskellige grunde er blevet glemt, og gav mig en hel bunke noder, blandt andet denne violinkoncert, jeg aldrig havde hørt om før. Det var vældig spændende. Jeg begyndte at spille lidt af den og fandt ud af, at musikken er utrolig fin, melodisk og godt skrevet for violinen. Man hører tydeligt det norske og det nordiske, samtidig med at den har et internationalt præg. Stakkels Borgstrøm var lidt uheldig med timingen, og hans violinkoncert var kun blevet spillet to gange nogensinde i Norge. Så jeg tænkte, hallo, mange burde da spille det værk, når nu det er så fint. Der er jo ikke ret mange norske violinkoncerter, der nyder anerkendelse«.

Hvordan fik du lov til at indspille en ukendt nordisk violinkoncert på dit debutalbum?

»Det var mit privilegium at vælge selv! Jeg havde vældig lyst til at indspille Sjostakovitjs Violinkoncert nr. 1, som jeg holder meget af. Men det er så sort og så tungt og emotionelt krævende, at jeg havde lyst til at kombinere den med noget helt anderledes. Noget nordisk og lyst i tonesproget. Borgstrøms violinkon­cert er fra den helt anden ende. Det er en interessant kombination«.

Det er vel en satsning at bruge kræfter på at indstudere sådan et ukendt stykke?

»Jo, men det er faktisk det bedste ud­ gangspunkt, for så er der ingen referen­ cepunkter. Jeg kan gøre akkurat, som jeg vil og skal ikke tage hensyn til, hvordan andre har spillet den. Borgstrøms violin­ koncert har mange kvaliteter, man kan arbejde med. Det er en rigtig skat, og jeg er vældig glad for at få muligheden til at give Borgstrøm revanche«, siger Eldbjørg Hemsing, som i år har opført violinkoncerten et par gange og til næste år spiller den tre gange til, blandt andet med dirigenten Paavo Järvi.